Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Beta’

Learn Linux the Hard Way

December 21st, 2012 12:11 admin View Comments

Education

An anonymous reader writes “Here is a free interactive beta of Learn Linux The Hard Way; a web-based virtual Linux environment which introduces the command line and other essential Linux concepts in 30 exercises. It’s written in the style of Zed A. Shaw’s Learn Code the Hard Way lessons. The authors says, ‘You will encounter many detailed tables containing lists of many fields. You may think you do not need most of this information, but what I am trying to do here is to teach you the right way to approach all this scary data. And this right way is to interpret this data as mathematical formulas, where every single symbol has its meaning.’ Of course, my first entry was rm -rf /* which only produced a stream of errors. I wish I had discovered something like a long time ago.”

Source: Learn Linux the Hard Way

Steam For Linux Is Now an Open Beta

December 19th, 2012 12:02 admin View Comments

Games

First time accepted submitter jotaass writes “In news that are guaranteed to make the Linux gaming community (in particular, but not exclusively) excited, Valve has just announced that the Steam for Linux client Beta is now open to the public. A .deb package is available here. Interesting as well, they are using an empty GitHub repository solely as an issue tracker, open for anyone to submit, edit and track bugs, with no actual code in the repo.”

Source: Steam For Linux Is Now an Open Beta

Fedora Adds MATE and Cinnamon Desktops to Main Repository, Releases Beta

November 28th, 2012 11:01 admin View Comments

GUI

Already available in third party repositories, the GNOME 2 fork MATE and GNOME 3 fork Cinnamon will now be included in Fedora 18. From the H: “After almost two months’ delay, the Fedora Project has released the first and final beta of Fedora 18. The distribution, which is code-named ‘Spherical Cow,’ includes the MATE desktop – a continuation of the classic GNOME 2 interface – in its repositories for the first time. Fedora 18′s default edition uses GNOME 3.6.2 as its interface and a separate KDE Spin provides the KDE Software Collection 4.9.3; Xfce 4.10 and version 1.6.7 of Linux Mint’s Cinnamon are also available from the distribution’s repositories.”

Source: Fedora Adds MATE and Cinnamon Desktops to Main Repository, Releases Beta

Firefox 18 Beta Out With IonMonkey JavaScript Engine

November 26th, 2012 11:01 admin View Comments

Firefox

An anonymous reader writes with a quick bite from The Next Web about the latest Firefox beta, this time featuring some under-the-hood improvements: “Mozilla on Monday announced the release of Firefox 18 beta for Windows, Mac, and Linux. You can download it now from Mozilla.org/Firefox/Beta. The biggest addition in this update is significant JavaScript improvements, courtesy of Mozilla’s new JavaScript JIT compiler called IonMonkey. The company promises the performance bump should be noticeable whenever Firefox is displaying Web apps, games, and other JavaScript-heavy pages.”

Source: Firefox 18 Beta Out With IonMonkey JavaScript Engine

KDE 4.10 Beta1 Released

November 21st, 2012 11:54 admin View Comments

KDE

sfcrazy writes “The KDE team has released the first beta for its renewed Workspaces, Applications, and Development Platform. ‘With API, dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team’s focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing new and old functionality.’ QtQuick in Plasma Workspaces has received a lot of work: ‘Plasma Quick, KDE’s extensions on top of QtQuick allow deeper integration with the system and more powerful apps and Plasma components. Plasma Containments can now be written in QtQuick. Various Plasma widgets have been rewritten in QtQuick, notably the system tray, pager, notifications, lock & logout, weather and weather station, comic strip and calculator plasmoids. Many performance, quality and usability improvements make Plasma Desktop and Netbook workspaces easier to use.’ Here’s the Feature Plan for 4.10.”

Source: KDE 4.10 Beta1 Released

Valve’s Steam License Causes Linux Packaging Concerns

November 16th, 2012 11:33 admin View Comments

Debian

New submitter skade88 writes “With the Linux Steam beta giving Ubuntu and its large userbase all the love, other Linux gamers understandably want to be let in on the fun. For the beta, Valve has provided Steam as a Debian package. Many hungry Linux gamers have reported that they have Steam running on their favorite distro, but that still leaves the legal debate. What is the legal threshold needed to get Steam in the repos of your preferred flavor of Linux? Will Valve’s one-size-fits-every-OS license be flexible to work on Linux or will it delay the dream of a viable gaming world for Linux? We are so close to bridging the last major hurdle in finally realizing the year of the Linux desktop: Gaming. Lets hope the FOSS community and Valve can play together so we all win.”

Source: Valve’s Steam License Causes Linux Packaging Concerns

Team Fortress 2 Beta Patch Adds Files Referring To Linux Support

October 23rd, 2012 10:17 admin View Comments

Games

New submitter spacenet writes “Valve has quietly released an update to the beta version of its popular online FPS Team Fortress 2. Among the modified files are some Linux-related files including a hardware driver compatibility list, optimal graphics settings, and a shell script launcher (previously only for OS X, now with a case for Linux as well). Valve has not updated their TF2 beta changelog, but has acknowledged the update in a forum post.”

Source: Team Fortress 2 Beta Patch Adds Files Referring To Linux Support

DARPA Funds a $300 Software-Defined Radio For Hackers

October 22nd, 2012 10:20 admin View Comments

Security

Sparrowvsrevolution writes with this story from Forbes: “Over the weekend at the ToorCon hacker conference in San Diego, Michael Ossmann of Great Scott Gadgets revealed a beta version of the HackRF Jawbreaker, the latest model of the wireless Swiss-army knife tools known as ‘software-defined radios.’ Like any software-defined radio, the HackRF can shift between different frequencies as easily as a computer switches between applications–It can both read and transmit signals from 100 megahertz to 6 gigahertz, intercepting or reproducing frequencies used by everything from FM radios to police communications to garage door openers to WiFi and GSM to next-generation air traffic control system messages. At Ossmann’s target price of $300, the versatile, open-source devices would cost less than half as much as currently existing software-defined radios with the same capabilities. And to fund the beta testing phase of HackRF, the Department of Defense research arm known as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) pitched in $200,000 last February as part of its Cyber Fast Track program.”

Source: DARPA Funds a $300 Software-Defined Radio For Hackers

First Community Release of Diaspora

October 8th, 2012 10:55 admin View Comments

Social Networks

New submitter Jalfro writes “Following premature rumors of it’s demise, the Diaspora core team announce the release of 0.0.1.0. ‘It’s been a couple of exciting months for us as we’ve shifted over to a model of community governance. After switching over to SemVer for our versioning system, and plugging away at fixing code through our new unstable branch, we’re excited to make our first release beyond the Alpha/Beta labels.’”

Source: First Community Release of Diaspora

ROSALIND: An Addictive Bioinformatics Learning Site

October 3rd, 2012 10:20 admin View Comments

Biotech

Shipud writes “Bioinformatics science which deals with the study of methods for storing, retrieving, and analyzing molecular biology data. Byte Size Biology writes about ROSALIND, a cool concept in learning bioinformatics, similar to Project Euler. You are given problems of increasing difficulty to solve. Start with nucleotide counting (trivial) and end with genome assembly (putting it mildly, not so trivial). To solve a problem, you download a sample data set, write your code and debug it. Once you think you are ready, you have a time limit to solve and provide an answer for the actual problem dataset. If you mess up, there is a timed new dataset to download. This thing is coder-addictive. Currently in Beta, but a lot of fun and seems stable.”

Source: ROSALIND: An Addictive Bioinformatics Learning Site