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FCC May Permit Robocalls To Cell Phones — If They Are Calling a Wrong Number

January 17th, 2015 01:07 admin Leave a comment Go to comments

Communications

An anonymous reader writes There have been plenty of false rumors about cell phones being opened up to telemarketers, but now the FCC is actually considering it. From the article: “Consumers have long had the support of government to try to control these calls, chiefly through the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, which actually allows consumers to file lawsuits and collect penalties from companies that pepper them with robocalls or text messages they didn’t agree to receive. But now the Federal Communications Commission is considering relaxing a key rule and allowing businesses to call or text your cellphones without authorization if they say they called a wrong number. The banking industry and collections industry are pushing for the change.” In one case recently, AT&T called one person 53 times after he told them they had a wrong number…and ended up paying $45 million to settle the case. Around 40 million phone numbers are “recycled” each year in the U.S. Twice, I’ve had to dump a number and get a new one because I was getting so many debt collection calls looking for someone else. Apparently the FCC commissioners may not be aware of the magnitude of the “wrong number” debt collection calls and aren’t aware that lots of people still have per-minute phone plans. Anyone can file comments on this proposal with the FCC.

Source: FCC May Permit Robocalls To Cell Phones — If They Are Calling a Wrong Number

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