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Archive for December, 2014

Sony Sends DMCA Notices Against Users Spreading Leaked Emails

December 31st, 2014 12:10 admin View Comments

Sony

Dangerous_Minds writes Last week, Sony threatened legal action against users spreading information obtained through the e-mails that were leaked as a result of the Sony hack. Sony has begun carrying through with those threats. Twitter, after resisting demands that a user account be suspended for publishing leaked e-mails, has received a DMCA notice saying that the e-mails are, weirdly enough, copyrighted.

Source: Sony Sends DMCA Notices Against Users Spreading Leaked Emails

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Bitcoin Gets Its First TV Ads

December 31st, 2014 12:00 admin View Comments

Bitcoin

MRothenberg writes Bitcoin’s not just for libertarians and drug dealers any more! Electronic payment service BitPay this week launched a campaign aimed at making Bitcoin transactions more appealing to mainstream business owners — the first time Bitcoin has been featured in a TV spot. Conceived by Felton Interactive Group, the two new ads promote Bitcoin and BitPay as a secure alternative to traditional credit-card transactions.

Source: Bitcoin Gets Its First TV Ads

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Ringing In 2015 With 40 Linux-Friendly Hacker SBCs

December 31st, 2014 12:05 admin View Comments
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The Billionaires’ Space Club

December 31st, 2014 12:58 admin View Comments

The Almighty Buck

theodp writes Silicon sultans are the new robber barons, writes The Economist, adding that “they have been diversifying into businesses that have little to do with computers, while egotistically proclaiming that they alone can solve mankind’s problems, from aging to space travel.” Over at Slate, NYU journalism prof Charles Seife is less-than impressed with The Billionaires’ Space Club. “It’s an old trick,” begins Seife. “Multimillionaires regularly try to spin acts of crass ego gratification as selfless philanthropy, no matter how obviously self-serving. They jump out of balloons at the edge of the atmosphere, take submarines to the bottom of the ocean, or shoot endangered animals on safari, all in the name of science and exploration. The more recent trend is billionaires making fleets of rocket ships for private space exploration. What makes this one different is that the public actually seems to buy the farce.” Seife goes on to argue that “neither [Elon] Musk’s nor [Richard] Branson’s goals really seem to break new ground, despite all the talk of exploration.”

Source: The Billionaires’ Space Club

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When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

December 31st, 2014 12:08 admin View Comments

United States

An anonymous reader writes We’ve talked quite a bit about National Security Letters (NSLs) and how the FBI/DOJ regularly abused them to get just about any information the government wanted with no oversight. As a form of an administrative subpoena — with a built in gag-order — NSLs are a great tool for the government to abuse the 4th Amendment. Recipients can’t talk about them, and no court has to review/approve them. Yet they certainly look scary to most recipients who don’t dare fight an NSL. That’s part of the reason why at least one court found them unconstitutional. At the same time, we’ve also been talking plenty about Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, which allows the DOJ/FBI (often working for the NSA) to go to the FISA Court and get rubberstamped court orders demanding certain ‘business records.’ As Ed Snowden revealed, these records requests can be as broad as basically ‘all details on all calls.’ But, since the FISA Court reviewed it, people insist it’s legal. And, of course, the FISA Court has the reputation as a rubberstamp for a reason — it almost never turns down a request. However, in the rare instances where it does, apparently, the DOJ doesn’t really care, knowing that it can just issue an NSL instead and get the same information. At least that appears to be what the DOJ quietly admitted to doing in a now declassified Inspector General’s report from 2008.”

Source: When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

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When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

December 31st, 2014 12:08 admin View Comments

United States

An anonymous reader writes We’ve talked quite a bit about National Security Letters (NSLs) and how the FBI/DOJ regularly abused them to get just about any information the government wanted with no oversight. As a form of an administrative subpoena — with a built in gag-order — NSLs are a great tool for the government to abuse the 4th Amendment. Recipients can’t talk about them, and no court has to review/approve them. Yet they certainly look scary to most recipients who don’t dare fight an NSL. That’s part of the reason why at least one court found them unconstitutional. At the same time, we’ve also been talking plenty about Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, which allows the DOJ/FBI (often working for the NSA) to go to the FISA Court and get rubberstamped court orders demanding certain ‘business records.’ As Ed Snowden revealed, these records requests can be as broad as basically ‘all details on all calls.’ But, since the FISA Court reviewed it, people insist it’s legal. And, of course, the FISA Court has the reputation as a rubberstamp for a reason — it almost never turns down a request. However, in the rare instances where it does, apparently, the DOJ doesn’t really care, knowing that it can just issue an NSL instead and get the same information. At least that appears to be what the DOJ quietly admitted to doing in a now declassified Inspector General’s report from 2008.”

Source: When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

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When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

December 31st, 2014 12:08 admin View Comments

United States

An anonymous reader writes We’ve talked quite a bit about National Security Letters (NSLs) and how the FBI/DOJ regularly abused them to get just about any information the government wanted with no oversight. As a form of an administrative subpoena — with a built in gag-order — NSLs are a great tool for the government to abuse the 4th Amendment. Recipients can’t talk about them, and no court has to review/approve them. Yet they certainly look scary to most recipients who don’t dare fight an NSL. That’s part of the reason why at least one court found them unconstitutional. At the same time, we’ve also been talking plenty about Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, which allows the DOJ/FBI (often working for the NSA) to go to the FISA Court and get rubberstamped court orders demanding certain ‘business records.’ As Ed Snowden revealed, these records requests can be as broad as basically ‘all details on all calls.’ But, since the FISA Court reviewed it, people insist it’s legal. And, of course, the FISA Court has the reputation as a rubberstamp for a reason — it almost never turns down a request. However, in the rare instances where it does, apparently, the DOJ doesn’t really care, knowing that it can just issue an NSL instead and get the same information. At least that appears to be what the DOJ quietly admitted to doing in a now declassified Inspector General’s report from 2008.”

Source: When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

December 31st, 2014 12:08 admin View Comments

United States

An anonymous reader writes We’ve talked quite a bit about National Security Letters (NSLs) and how the FBI/DOJ regularly abused them to get just about any information the government wanted with no oversight. As a form of an administrative subpoena — with a built in gag-order — NSLs are a great tool for the government to abuse the 4th Amendment. Recipients can’t talk about them, and no court has to review/approve them. Yet they certainly look scary to most recipients who don’t dare fight an NSL. That’s part of the reason why at least one court found them unconstitutional. At the same time, we’ve also been talking plenty about Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, which allows the DOJ/FBI (often working for the NSA) to go to the FISA Court and get rubberstamped court orders demanding certain ‘business records.’ As Ed Snowden revealed, these records requests can be as broad as basically ‘all details on all calls.’ But, since the FISA Court reviewed it, people insist it’s legal. And, of course, the FISA Court has the reputation as a rubberstamp for a reason — it almost never turns down a request. However, in the rare instances where it does, apparently, the DOJ doesn’t really care, knowing that it can just issue an NSL instead and get the same information. At least that appears to be what the DOJ quietly admitted to doing in a now declassified Inspector General’s report from 2008.”

Source: When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

December 31st, 2014 12:08 admin View Comments

United States

An anonymous reader writes We’ve talked quite a bit about National Security Letters (NSLs) and how the FBI/DOJ regularly abused them to get just about any information the government wanted with no oversight. As a form of an administrative subpoena — with a built in gag-order — NSLs are a great tool for the government to abuse the 4th Amendment. Recipients can’t talk about them, and no court has to review/approve them. Yet they certainly look scary to most recipients who don’t dare fight an NSL. That’s part of the reason why at least one court found them unconstitutional. At the same time, we’ve also been talking plenty about Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, which allows the DOJ/FBI (often working for the NSA) to go to the FISA Court and get rubberstamped court orders demanding certain ‘business records.’ As Ed Snowden revealed, these records requests can be as broad as basically ‘all details on all calls.’ But, since the FISA Court reviewed it, people insist it’s legal. And, of course, the FISA Court has the reputation as a rubberstamp for a reason — it almost never turns down a request. However, in the rare instances where it does, apparently, the DOJ doesn’t really care, knowing that it can just issue an NSL instead and get the same information. At least that appears to be what the DOJ quietly admitted to doing in a now declassified Inspector General’s report from 2008.”

Source: When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

December 31st, 2014 12:08 admin View Comments

United States

An anonymous reader writes We’ve talked quite a bit about National Security Letters (NSLs) and how the FBI/DOJ regularly abused them to get just about any information the government wanted with no oversight. As a form of an administrative subpoena — with a built in gag-order — NSLs are a great tool for the government to abuse the 4th Amendment. Recipients can’t talk about them, and no court has to review/approve them. Yet they certainly look scary to most recipients who don’t dare fight an NSL. That’s part of the reason why at least one court found them unconstitutional. At the same time, we’ve also been talking plenty about Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act, which allows the DOJ/FBI (often working for the NSA) to go to the FISA Court and get rubberstamped court orders demanding certain ‘business records.’ As Ed Snowden revealed, these records requests can be as broad as basically ‘all details on all calls.’ But, since the FISA Court reviewed it, people insist it’s legal. And, of course, the FISA Court has the reputation as a rubberstamp for a reason — it almost never turns down a request. However, in the rare instances where it does, apparently, the DOJ doesn’t really care, knowing that it can just issue an NSL instead and get the same information. At least that appears to be what the DOJ quietly admitted to doing in a now declassified Inspector General’s report from 2008.”

Source: When FISA Court Rejects a Surveillance Request, the FBI Issues a NSL Instead

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: