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Archive for March, 2013

Indies the Biggest Stars At Game Developers Conference

March 31st, 2013 03:02 admin View Comments

Games

RougeFemme writes Indies beat out mainstream studios for most of the Game Developers Choice Awards. FTL: Faster Than Light, an independent game financed by a Kickstarter campaign, won the award for Best Debut. Because of the growing success of the indies, Eric Zimmerman, game designer and instructor at the NYU Game Center, is canceling the Game Design Challenge that he’s held at the conference for the last 10 years. ‘The idea of doing strange, bizarre, experimental games is no longer strange, bizarre or experimental.’”

Source: Indies the Biggest Stars At Game Developers Conference

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First Petaflop Supercomputer To Shut Down

March 31st, 2013 03:00 admin View Comments

IBM

An anonymous reader writes “In 2008 Roadrunner was the world’s fastest supercomputer. Now that the first system to break the petaflop barrier has lost a step on today’s leaders it will be shut down and dismantled. In its five years of operation, the Roadrunner was the ‘workhorse’ behind the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Advanced Simulation and Computing program, providing key computer simulations for the Stockpile Stewardship Program.”

Source: First Petaflop Supercomputer To Shut Down

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Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

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Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

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Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

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Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

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Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

March 31st, 2013 03:31 admin View Comments

Businesses

Hugh Pickens writes writes “The Mercury News reports that Nolan Bushnell, who ran video game pioneer Atari in the early 1970s, says he always saw something special in Steve Jobs, and that Atari’s refusal to be corralled by the status quo was one of the reasons Jobs went to work there in 1974 as an unkempt, contemptuous 19-year-old. ‘The truth is that very few companies would hire Steve, even today,’ says Bushnell. ‘Why? Because he was an outlier. To most potential employers, he’d just seem like a jerk in bad clothing.’ While at Atari, Bushnell broke the corporate mold, creating a template that is now common through much of Silicon Valley. He allowed employees to turn Atari’s lobby into a cross between a video game arcade and the Amazon jungle. He started holding keg parties and hiring live bands to play for his employees after work. He encouraged workers to nap during their shifts, reasoning that a short rest would stimulate more creativity when they were awake. He also promised a summer sabbatical every seven years. Bushnell’s newly released book, Finding The Next Steve Jobs: How to Find, Hire, Keep and Nurture Creative Talent, serves as a primer on how to ensure a company doesn’t turn into a mind-numbing bureaucracy that smothers existing employees and scares off rule-bending innovators such as Jobs. The basics: Make work fun; weed out the naysayers; celebrate failure, and then learn from it; allow employees to take short naps during the day; and don’t shy away from hiring talented people just because they look sloppy or lack college credentials. Bushnell is convinced that there are all sorts of creative and unconventional people out there working at companies today. The problem is that corporate managers don’t recognize them. Or when they do, they push them to conform rather than create. ‘Some of the best projects to ever come out of Atari or Chuck E. Cheese’s were from high school dropouts, college dropouts,’ says Bushnell, ‘One guy had been in jail.’”

Source: Steve Jobs’ First Boss: ‘Very Few Companies Would Hire Steve, Even Today’

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