Archive

Archive for December, 2009

Apple Censors Dalai Lama iPhone Apps In China

December 31st, 2009 12:52 admin View Comments

eldavojohn writes “Google and Yahoo! have relinquished any sort of ethical integrity with regards to free speech in China but Apple appears to be following suit by blocking Dalai Lama applications in the Chinese iPhone app store. An official Apple statement reads, ‘We continue to comply with local laws. Not all apps are available in every country.’ A small monetary price to pay for the economic boon that is the blooming Chinese cell phone market but a very large price to pay for that in principals.”

Source: Apple Censors Dalai Lama iPhone Apps In China

Raise a Glass — Time(2) Turns 40 Tonight

December 31st, 2009 12:47 admin View Comments

ddt writes “Raise your glasses of champagne in a toast at midnight. The time(2) system call turns 40 tonight, and is now officially ‘over the hill.’ It’s dutifully keeping track of time for clueful operating systems since January 1, 1970.” And speaking of time, if you don’t have *nix system handy, or just want a second opinion, an anonymous reader points out this handy way to check just how far it is after local midnight in Unix time.

Source: Raise a Glass — Time(2) Turns 40 Tonight

Phase Change Memory vs. Storage As We Know It

December 31st, 2009 12:24 admin View Comments

storagedude writes “Access to data isn’t keeping pace with advances in CPU and memory, creating an I/O bottleneck that threatens to make data storage irrelevant. The author sees phase change memory as a technology that could unseat storage networks. From the article: ‘While years away, PCM has the potential to move data storage and storage networks from the center of data centers to the periphery. I/O would only have to be conducted at the start and end of the day, with data parked in memory while applications are running. In short, disk becomes the new tape.”

Source: Phase Change Memory vs. Storage As We Know It

What Would Have Entered the Public Domain Tomorrow?

December 31st, 2009 12:55 admin View Comments

An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from Duke’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain about items that would enter the public domain starting on January 1, 2010, if not for copyright extenions: “‘Casino Royale, Marilyn Monroe’s Playboy cover, The Adventures of Augie March, the Golden Age of Science Fiction, Crick & Watson’s Nature article decoding the double helix, Disney’s Peter Pan, The Crucible’… ‘How ironic that Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, with its book burning firemen, was published in 1953 and would once have been entering the public domain on January 1, 2010. To quote James Boyle, “Bradbury’s firemen at least set fire to their own culture out of deep ideological commitment, vile though it may have been. We have set fire to our cultural record for no reason; even if we had wanted retrospectively to enrich the tiny number of beneficiaries whose work keeps commercial value beyond 56 years, we could have done so without these effects. The ironies are almost too painful to contemplate.”"

Source: What Would Have Entered the Public Domain Tomorrow?

New Open Source Intrusion Detector Suricata Released

December 31st, 2009 12:42 admin View Comments

richrumble writes “The OISF has released the beta version of the Suricata IDS/IPS engine: The Suricata Engine is an Open Source Next Generation Intrusion Detection and Prevention Engine. This engine is not intended to just replace or emulate the existing tools in the industry, but will bring new ideas and technologies to the field. This new Engine supports Mult-Threading, Automatic Protocol Detection (IP, TCP, UDP, ICMP, HTTP, TLS, FTP and SMB! ), Gzip Decompression, Fast IP Matching and coming soon hardware acceleration on CUDA and OpenCL GPU cards.”

Source: New Open Source Intrusion Detector Suricata Released

The Twelve Most Tarnished Brands In Tech

December 31st, 2009 12:33 admin View Comments

harrymcc writes “Polaroid, Netscape, CompuServe, Westinghouse, Heathkit — these were once among the most respected names in the technology business. They’re still around, but what’s happened to them is just plain sad. I took a look at the tragic fates of a dozen mighty brands that have, in one way or another, fallen on hard times.”

Source: The Twelve Most Tarnished Brands In Tech

How-To Wiki: Estimate the Height of Tall Objects

December 31st, 2009 12:00 admin View Comments

Determining the height of tall objects from a glance doesn’t require a prohibitively large tape measure — just a little math, a sharp eye and a protractor.

Source: How-To Wiki: Estimate the Height of Tall Objects

The Decade’s 10 Most Dastardly Cybercrimes

December 31st, 2009 12:00 admin View Comments

It was the decade of the mega-heist! Stolen credit card magstripe tracks became the pork bellies of a new underground marketplace. Eastern European hackers turned malware writing into an art. And a nasty new crop of purpose-driven computer worms struck dread in the heart of America.

Source: The Decade’s 10 Most Dastardly Cybercrimes

The Mobile Decade: Greatest Innovative Gadgets

December 31st, 2009 12:00 admin View Comments

From the iPod to the Kindle, the past decade has seen the rise of portable electronics like never before. Wired brings you the top gadgets of each year from 2000 to 2009, charting the rise of the mobile decade.

Source: The Mobile Decade: Greatest Innovative Gadgets

Top Scientific Breakthroughs of 2009

December 31st, 2009 12:00 admin View Comments

Wired Science runs down our picks for some of the best science of the year.

Source: Top Scientific Breakthroughs of 2009

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